Mango Called Romance. You Read It Right. And Fruits Twice

Come summer when it’s sultry and the temperature goes south, reaching close to 40 degrees, I enter the mango phase. I dream, think of mangoes and nurse a desire to acquire mango varieties I have heard of or read about.

Every summer I come to know of a mango variety that I was not familiar with. Why summer? Because that’s the time people talk passionately, especially growers about their mangoes.

Mango lovers are very tradition-bound and unwilling to try hybrids. Like their parents and grandparents, they continue to live in the thrall of Alphonsos, Kesars, Himsagars, Mankurads, Langdas, Fazlis, Maldas and others. And this fascination is reflected in the growers preference too. He prefers to grow only those varieties that have a market. But there are mavericks too, who gather unknown or lesser-known varieties and grow them while keeping the fruits to themselves.

This March I discovered three varieties, all hybrids. In fact, I have made a promise to myself to seek out growers all over the country who are custodians of lesser-known varieties revelling in the diversity of Mangifera Indica.

It was through a professor and a farmer that I was introduced to Miraj-based Parmanand Gavane, a maverick who practices the ultra-high-density plantation system with 900 Kesar trees on an acre. He has a plantation of 3600 trees, spread on four acres.

Along with Kesar, Baneshan, Tommy Atkins he has a mango hybrid which fruits twice a year, named Al Rumania, Romania or just Rumani which he acquired from Tamil Nadu.

Gavane with a bunch of Rumani

Those in the 40s and 50s may have seen or heard about the Hindi movie, Thoda Sa Rumani Ho Jayen (1990). Yes, Rumani is romantic in Urdu.

Mostly grown in North Andhra Pradesh, the ripened mango skin of Rumani is yellowish-green with a red tint at the top. The pulp is sweet and golden yellow. Its pulp is sweet, juicy and with the least fibre. Rumani is mostly used as a table fruit and also for making mango drinks. The fruit is spheroid shaped and weighs around 250g.

According to Gavane when tender and raw it’s picked and used for making pickles. He has 500 Rumanis on 25 gunthas of land. Barely two years and six months old its maiden fruit appeared last year, once in November and now he is expecting another harvest in May. Those interested in Rumani grafts Gavane can be a good source.

Rumanis hanging from the tree

Rumani has a hybrid cousin, thanks to the union between Rumani and Mulgova. It’s called AU Rumani.

…..

Whenever we think of Gujarat we generally think of two varieties, namely Kesar and Mulgova. A few days back I came to know of hybrid varieties which only connoisseurs are aware of. Only those living around Navsari are aware of Sonpari. Those who have tasted Sonpari don’t bother much about Alphonso, a variety favourite among those residing in Mumbai and Pune.

Sonpari arrives in April and stays till May end. Last year the season began with Rs 2,000 for 20 pieces and by season-end, it was still at Rs 1200 for 20! Developed by Mango Research Centre, Paria in Navsari it was released in 2000. As it takes close to six years to fruit there were hardly any takers for the variety initially. But those who did consider planting it now nourish it as their family jewel unwilling to put the fruit on sale and prefer to give it to friends and relatives as a gift. Horticulturist Ankush Patel tells me last year he could lay his hands on some. “Once relished its taste and aroma lingers for hours,” he explains.

Sonpari’s peel is very thin and does not adhere to the pulp which is firm and fibreless with attractive golden yellow in colour. The taste is excellent and resembles that of Alphonso.

Much before Sonpari’s debut one Dr R. I. Bhatt who was the Research Scientist (Hort.), AES, GAU, Paria had released Neelphonso, Neeleshwari and Neeleshan in 1986.

Neelphonso was developed by taking Neelam as a female parent and Alphonso is its male parent. Trees of Neelphonso are oval-shaped, moderately in growth with suberect branches and have dense foliage. This hybrid is moderate regular in bearing but a late bearing tendency. The tree bears fruits singly. The fruits are ready for harvest in July-August when most of the mangos have been harvested and eaten. Some trees have been found to ripen in September. Due to this, the fruits of Neelphonso get a good market price. The oval oblique shaped fruits of Neelphonso are medium in size weighing about 200g. The skin colour on ripening becomes apricot yellow while the pulp becomes orange-yellow. Due to thick, smooth skin, the fruits are not harmed by the rains.

Neeleshwari was developed by taking Neelam as female and Dashehari as a male parent. Like Amrapali. The trees of this hybrid are round shaped with dwarfing nature and sparse foliage containing lanceolate leaves. It bears narrowly oblong-shaped fruits moderately and regularly in bunches of two-three fruits. The fruits are free from spongy tissue disorder. The skin colour on ripening turns apricot yellow while pulp colour becomes yellow. The thin smooth skin adheres to moderately firm textured flesh. The non-fibrous juicy pulp is suited for the table as well as for making juice and has moderate keeping quality.

Neeleshan was developed by taking Neelam as female and Baneshan as the male parent. The trees of this hybrid are spherical or dome-shaped, sub-erect to spreading branches and moderate-vigorous in growth with dense foliage containing oblong leaves. It bears attractive obovoid shaped fruits heavily and regularly. Generally, the fruit bears singly or in a bunch of two. The fruits are free from spongy tissue disorder. The average weight of fruits is about 318g. On ripening the skin become cadmium yellow while the pulp becomes attractive golden yellow in colour. The fruit skin is thin, smooth, moderate adhering to the pulp with a firm and non-fibrous texture. The fruits are suited for table purpose and have very good keeping quality of more than 10 days after ripening.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s