Turmeric Story: Farm to Latte

A letter to my turmeric buyers

Now as you’ve received the organically grown haldi (turmeric) powder, sans preservatives and additives I would like to share some details which will help you appreciate how the crop is grown and later processed.

If by any chance, you visit my handkerchief-sized plot–for it’s just an acre–which overlooks the perennial river Barvi you will witness that I grow turmeric as an intercrop, that’s in-between the space offered by mango, chickoo, dragon fruit, custard apple, phalsa, jackfruit, coconut, love apple, cashew nut, mulberry, papaya, avocado, betel vine, pineapple and scores of medicinal herbs and spices.

Step on my farm in the months following October you’ll find the farm’s red soil which hides the stones and boulders exist in harmony with heaps of leaf litter, dried grass, fallen twigs and branches all over giving the impression that it belongs to a lazy farmer who can’t even keep his farm clean!

I suggest you drop on your haunches, pick a decaying twig and you will watch a miracle unfold–scores of termites munching on it and in the process creating soil. Yes, really. You’re witnessing a live demo of nature’s closely guarded secret. I’ve never tried to exterminate the termites because I know I will meet with failure for these tiny bugs have been around far longer than us, and it would be foolish on my part to believe that they can be exterminated! Many have tried and many in future would but you can’t overpower them. And if you did chances are that the soil will become pesticide rich. Earlier you accepted it’s better. It’s the termites who make the soil porous and are an inalienable part of Earth’s ecosystem. 

The millions of termites and earthworms make my farm their home and I have let them be for they are extremely beneficial to the soil’s health and farm’s future.

Coming to turmeric, I sow the rhizomes (planting material) a week before the rains arrive on raised soil beds enriched with vermicompost, farmyard manure, biofertilizer and jeevamrit . They remain under the soil close to nine months and grow in volumes spreading its roots while the leaves having opened the earth receive and absorb the sun to make food. In December the leaves which till recently were used to make a sweet dish using rice flour and jaggery have yellowed and dried up. Sending you signs that irrigate it once a fortnight.

Come April it’s time to harvest the rhizomes and mother rhizomes which have become as big as your palm after having occupied precious farm space for nine long months! Consider this with grains which mature within 120 to 150 days. Reason enough why this spice attracts a premium price. More so when its grown using natural and non-chemical fertilisers.  Did you know that the same patch of land cannot be used successively to grow turmeric as the crop exhausts the soil of its nutrients and needs to be left fallow for a season? Or go for a bi-annual crop.

Harvested, the rhizomes and the fingers are thoroughly cleaned, washed and then boiled for close to 45 minutes. As the vapours rise the cooked haldi spreads its aroma all over disinfecting the air and saying to us: I’ve arrived to bestow you with health. When volumes are high rhizomes are boiled in boilers. Once the rhizomes cool they are split and dried for a fortnight in shade. Hard and dried the rhizomes look like insects waiting to be powdered. From harvest to powder the volume reduces to a quarter. Which means if the harvest is around 100kg,  the powder you get at hand is merely 25kg. 

Having come to know of an indigenous variety cultivated by the tribals of Srikakulam district of Andhra Pradesh which has 6 per cent curcumin and 9 per cent volatile oil content, this year we sourced the rhizomes (planting material) from Srikakulam–a distance of 1460 km from our farm in Badlapur, Maharashtra. 

It’s aroma is excellent and unparalleled, one has to savour it to experience it’s purity. Those used to packaged/ branded haldi will immediately feel the difference. 

A physician friend who rode with a kilo of our haldi in his car complained that he had to breathe the spice-laced air for two days!

Ayurveda physicians also suggest haldi for skin problems, like acne. Make a paste of haldi using virgin coconut oil and a pinch of camphor. Apply before going to bed and wash it in the morning. You will see the difference within two days.

Interestingly you will find the colour of our new harvest yellow-ochreish and not yellow you’re familiar with. 

Importantly the haldi we offer is not only chemical-free it has no preservatives and neither do we add corn powder to increase the volumes. It’s just pure haldi. Har kan kan mein haldi, as I would like to say.

With  haldi powder reaching you its journey ends when you take it specifically to boost your health (yes some use it on their dishes).  And if you do we advise you to take it either with warm milk or ghee after adding a pinch of black pepper. The fat in the milk or ghee hastens the absorption of curcumin (haldi) and piperine (black pepper). 

Lastly, thanks for making me an agripreneur though I still continue to be a journalist. 

Tip: Always store spices including haldi in steel or glass containers to ensure long shelf-life.

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2 thoughts on “Turmeric Story: Farm to Latte

  1. nadavu

    Dear Sir
    I am from Chennai and a friend of mine is at Bombay. It would not be possible for me to come over there. Can i ask my friend who is looking after a farm at a hillock near Panvel to call on you for more guidance? Please send me your contact number.
    Regards
    Giri Kumar

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